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It took my mother a total of 64 years of life before she could purchase her very first home, and it is everything she has ever wanted it to be. A rural farmhouse atop a hill that makes your ears pop as you ascend. Her neighbors are dairy farms, apple orchards and pumpkin patches which leaves her with endless excitement. Just 3 weeks after completing Chemotherapy and her second round of cancer treatment in the last 15 years, she is totally ready to take on the challenges of renovating a 1700s farmhouse.

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Yesterday we decided it was time to pull down the drop ceiling in what used to be the kitchen, and yes we wondered what could possibly possess a person to put a drop ceiling in an antique home. Well we found out. Midway through my pulling down of the tiles with a crowbar, which I only maimed myself with a little, I found lovely old water damage on the underlying sheetrock. Previous owners had a leak at some point, and while they repaired the cause of the leak they never repaired the underlying damage! They simply put in drop ceiling to conceal it! Talk about a bandaid for a bullet wound!

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This type of lazy repair work is pretty common in older homes, they have had many years of owners ill-equiped to take on the projects that come in general homeownership let alone the responsibilities of owning an antique home. Any renovation lover can tell of the pain it is to walk around antique homes and see the damage inflicted by previous owners, and how it can take a lot of work to backtrack what has been done.

 

We still have our work cut out for us, 3 more rooms with drop ceilings, moving of plumbing and electrical,  plus replacement of exterior clapboards and windows that have been rotted by water from missing gutters. Keep tuned in as we dig into this antique and get it ready for Grandma D to call it home.

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