Low Cost DIY Front Door Refresh

Having a red front door is a must for any house I live in. It’s bright, warm and welcoming. Now our front door is a 1973 original and it was more than just a little blah. I have thought about a total replacement but doors are expensive and hard to in stall.

Now lets look back, the front door was a dusty red, with a horrendous paint job. The hardware was worn bronze with patina starting to show up. I finally decided to repaint the door and replace the hardware with a more modern black matte finish set. I wanted to accomplish this little renovation on a budget.

Here’s what I used:

Rust-Oleum Painter’s Touch – Gloss Apple Red for $8.27

Belleview Venetian Bronze Single Cylinder Door Handleset –  $93.00

Project total = $101.27

Similar new doors can cost upwards of $600! This front door refresh is a nice alternative for a fraction of the cost!

“I really liked being the girl behind the red door.” – Brooke Davis One Tree Hill

I am not going to lie, the handle was pretty hard to install, not because of the complexity but rather because of the door itself. The door is old and the handle didn’t fit perfectly at first. I had to break out the drill to expand some of the pre-cut holes to allow for the new hardware.

Friday Favorites: Five Instagrams You Need to Follow

If there are a couple things that I love it is: Friday, friends and amazing home decor instagrams. Is there anything better than perusing a well done, gorgeous Instagram? Chuck full of envy inducing gorgeous pictures or their homes or personal designs! I have gathered a list of my favorite instagram accounts that I think YOU should be following!

 

Photo Curtesy of @cottonstem

@Cottonstem

Erin seems to live a charmed life, she shares her gorgeous home and family through her beautiful Instagram feed. Her images can make me down right drool over her vintage inspired design. Her mix of shabby chic with more glamorous pieces are an obvious draw to her feed.  Her home always seems to be perfectly organized, it makes you wonder how she manages such perfection with children in toe!

Photo Curtesy of @bentleyblonde

@bentleyblonde:

Not only is Wendy a lovely person who I have had the joy of working with, her posts (or videos on youtube) are absolutely gorgeous. Her warm and sweet personality shows through in her pictures and anything she posts. She hits the modern farmhouse style nail right on the head in all of her images. Plus, you can always catch one of her haul videos to find out exactly where she got each of her pieces displayed in her home.

Photo Curtesy of @idreamofhomemaking

@idreamofhomemaking

Jessica has a beautiful feed with a neutral palette and a splash of color. I can’t help but love her true modern farmhouse style with all its rustic glory. Even with her large family she somehow manages to have the time to make her home look so picture perfect. Trust me Jessica we are all jealous.

Photo Curtesy of @purejoyhome

@purejoyhome

I think what I love about Liz Joy’s feed is the mix of images of her family, outfits and her gorgeous home. Its never boring and it’s always drawing me in. I love that she is able to mix in a lot of pink with her neutral tones, which adds an amazing famine flare to her pictures and her decor. I also have to love another colonial loving New Englander out there. Plus we both have Joy in our names!

Photo Curtesy of @ourvintagenest

@ourvintagenest

This is a popular Instagram among modern farmhouse style enthusiasts. I think it goes without saying the feed is absolutely gorgeous, I wouldn’t include one with subpar imagery. I personally love Alicia’s pictures given her use of grey throughout her home, something that I am also a HUGE fan of. She’s not scared of color, although generally on a muted scale. Something that can be missing from many of the farmhouse styles out there.

Untouched Rustic Farmhouse, Yes Please!

We all dream of finding that diamond in the rough. That fantastic rustic farmhouse just waiting for us to rescue it, or for it to rescue you. I recently stumbled on this one online and I must admit I am drooling. I am totally unabashedly, head over heels in love with this truly untouched 1890s farmhouse. When I first saw articles about this house I really got giddy and knew I just had to share! Oh what would I do if I had access to this massive ornate farmhouse.

Lets take a look at the details!

Keller Williams / Anne Taylor Photography and Design

This 4,000+ square foot farmhouse is true to the Victorian Era, packed full of incredible ornate details. Most notably the railings of the farmhouse porch exhibit amazing design.

Wholly Shiplap Batman!

Keller Williams / Anne Taylor Photography and Design

Are we seeing an entire room of the authentic whitewashed paneling we have all come to know and love, thanks to the Lovely Joanna Gaines? Yes! Absolutely amazing, such drama to this room. Although there is obviously a ton of work to be done, this room still has so much appeal.

Look at these windows!

Keller Williams / Anne Taylor Photography and Design

I am a sucker for big rooms with lots of light. Take a peek at these massive windows in this room! These windows are also pretty characteristic of the era. Big panes of windows became popular during the Victorian period, and they really shine here.

What about that staircase?

Keller Williams / Anne Taylor Photography and Design

Now this isn’t the grandest staircase I have ever seen but It is certainly eye catching. A nice solid, appealing staircase is another must have on my renovation dream check list! I can’t have been the only little girl who dreamed about sauntering down a grand staircase as a princess or perhaps a Jedi…don’t judge me.

 

 

What would you do with this lovely home? Comment below!

 

The Work Begins at the good Ol’ Chicken Farm

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It took my mother a total of 64 years of life before she could purchase her very first home, and it is everything she has ever wanted it to be. A rural farmhouse atop a hill that makes your ears pop as you ascend. Her neighbors are dairy farms, apple orchards and pumpkin patches which leaves her with endless excitement. Just 3 weeks after completing Chemotherapy and her second round of cancer treatment in the last 15 years, she is totally ready to take on the challenges of renovating a 1700s farmhouse.

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Yesterday we decided it was time to pull down the drop ceiling in what used to be the kitchen, and yes we wondered what could possibly possess a person to put a drop ceiling in an antique home. Well we found out. Midway through my pulling down of the tiles with a crowbar, which I only maimed myself with a little, I found lovely old water damage on the underlying sheetrock. Previous owners had a leak at some point, and while they repaired the cause of the leak they never repaired the underlying damage! They simply put in drop ceiling to conceal it! Talk about a bandaid for a bullet wound!

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This type of lazy repair work is pretty common in older homes, they have had many years of owners ill-equiped to take on the projects that come in general homeownership let alone the responsibilities of owning an antique home. Any renovation lover can tell of the pain it is to walk around antique homes and see the damage inflicted by previous owners, and how it can take a lot of work to backtrack what has been done.

 

We still have our work cut out for us, 3 more rooms with drop ceilings, moving of plumbing and electrical,  plus replacement of exterior clapboards and windows that have been rotted by water from missing gutters. Keep tuned in as we dig into this antique and get it ready for Grandma D to call it home.

DIY Fireplace makeover

 

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Oh what to to do with a fireplace with outdated tile that doesn’t match your style or color scheme at all? If it’s brick, easy, white wash it and enjoy the new lighter tones. But tile does present its own challenge. In our case, our new house has faux marble tile surrounded by a gorgeous hearth. I knew I wanted to cover it with a look that was a little more chic and feminie but I wasn’t sure what.

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The Photo above shows what we were starting with (a photo that I was able to steal from the listing from when we purchased the house). Bland walls that allowed the amazing hearth blend in and drew the eye to the earth toned marble tile. So first thing first we spruced the walls by adding a fresh coat of Sherwin Williams Wet Pavement paint to add contrast between the walls and trim, while also allowing for a cooler color pallet that I tend to favor.

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Step One: Tape and Prime

This is a really important step, I love the way my hearth looks in white so I wanted to make sure a did a really good job taping off the edges. Because tile is very tricky to paint, as it is a glossy smooth surface, you need to start with a primer that will give the paint a surface to stick to. If you weren’t to do this it would get very streaky and probably start peeling immediately.

I used a small 4-inch roller (my new favorite thing) to apply Zinsser Cover Stain – Primer-Stain Blocker and Bond Coat. I did multiple coats until I was happy with the texture and cover and let it dry for a couple hours. Bone-headed moment warning — I typically set up fans when painting to get rid of the nasty smell (especially when using a strong primer). However I decied to point my fan directly the fire place, which of course stirred soot everywhere. Including the freshly primed surfaces. This was a 15 minute delay as I had to quickly remove the soot and repaint the effected areas. So please do not point fans directly at the fireplace while working!

Step 2: Painting

I utilized the same 4-inch roller to apply white semi-gloss paint to the entire surface of the tile, waited for it to dry and applied a second coat. At his point the next step is taping off for the stripes, which means the underlying white needs to be COMPLETELY dry before applying the tape. This is incredibly important, if the white paint is still tacky, the tape when removed will pull at the paint and primer and you will make a mess that requires a lot of touch up.

Step 3: Stripes!

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I measured the width of the painters tape, I so happened to buy, at 1 3/4 inches and used that as the spacing. Starting with the very bottom, I placed the bottom pieces flush against the corner of the angle, making sure that the tape was long enough to extend beyond the painting surface. Measuring up from there, I used a sharpie to mark every 1 3/4 inches. Once the marks were made, I applied the tape every other space all the way up in the most level manner possible. After each tape placement I verified with a small level that they were even.

Step 4: More Painting

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Next using a combonation of a small foam paint brush and 4-inch roller I applied the black paint to the spaces inbetween the tape. This was tricky as it was easy to see streaks of white through the black. In total there was at least 2-3 coats of black paint and inbetween each I allowed them to dry a little, this helped prevent additional streaking.

Once the black was done I allowed it to partially dry. Now this may be up to some debate but I like to remove my painters tape before the paint is completely dry, this prevents the paint pulling up when it’s removed. However if you do it too soon, and the paint is too wet you can get dripping or smudges.

Step 5: Touch ups

Inevitably there will be some bleeding or smudging along the way. But resist the urge to try to touch it up immediately. Wait until the black dries completely then using a small foam brush or other paint brush touch up the errors. With waiting until the paint is completely dry, you avoid mixing paints that may still be wet and getting odd gray tones.

TA-DA the finished product!

 

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