Low Cost DIY Front Door Refresh

Having a red front door is a must for any house I live in. It’s bright, warm and welcoming. Now our front door is a 1973 original and it was more than just a little blah. I have thought about a total replacement but doors are expensive and hard to in stall.

Now lets look back, the front door was a dusty red, with a horrendous paint job. The hardware was worn bronze with patina starting to show up. I finally decided to repaint the door and replace the hardware with a more modern black matte finish set. I wanted to accomplish this little renovation on a budget.

Here’s what I used:

Rust-Oleum Painter’s Touch – Gloss Apple Red for $8.27

Belleview Venetian Bronze Single Cylinder Door Handleset –  $93.00

Project total = $101.27

Similar new doors can cost upwards of $600! This front door refresh is a nice alternative for a fraction of the cost!

“I really liked being the girl behind the red door.” – Brooke Davis One Tree Hill

I am not going to lie, the handle was pretty hard to install, not because of the complexity but rather because of the door itself. The door is old and the handle didn’t fit perfectly at first. I had to break out the drill to expand some of the pre-cut holes to allow for the new hardware.

Drab to Fab! Living Room Redesign

I love love love to share my own house when I can. Sometimes I feel so busy focusing on others houses that mine gets neglected! Ahh! I have to say have a robot vacuum has saved my life, in a world of endless dog fur! Finally we were able to finish the neutral grey paint in the living room and really spruce up the decor pieces with some real vintage fun.

Before:

Now don’t get me wrong, I love yellow and really contemplated keeping the yellow walls. The downfall? It’s hard to stay neutral with such a bright color on the walls. Also the previous owner didn’t spend the big bucks on the high quality paint and it started to wear pretty fast with the one-year-old and two big dogs in the house.

Now it’s pretty obvious that this room was void of all style previously. Worn couches and bland furniture and literally no decor at all. With such a warm room, I mean look at that bay window, the lack of style sucked all character right out of the house. The most I can say is that it was clean…

Once again can we say blahhhh. Also check out those folding doors in the back! Yeah I took those off basically day one. Our house is a classic New England Cape Cod style, with character intrinsic to the build. However, the lack of decor and the drab furniture made it look so bland.

After:

Ta-da!We added the neutral grey paint but kept the pops of yellow in the room to brighten things up, since the room already gets loads of natural light. I threw in some modern decor pieces in the oar and porthole-esque mirror. Of course I added a lot of vintage pieces to makes things look a little more unique and authentic. Here’s a close up of the tall table display and wall art focal point. The print is a Refined Relics original, you may recognize from the February Heirloom Box. Such a sweet throw back, a classic movie quote print in the gold foil font. The sheet music is one of my favorite vintage design inspirations, this particular piece is circa 1920. This vintage milk bottle makes an awesome vase, this one also comes from the 1920s.

Thanks for reading as always!

Chandelier Upgrade!!

Since we moved into our little Cape Code, this “chandelier” has been driving me absolutely crazy. Even if it was broken, I hadn’t made it to it on the never ending to-do list. This weekend I finally ripped out the old dingy, oh-so-boring light fixture. While I was at it, I opted to finally change the happy yellow walls to something a little more neutral. Gray! I know surprise, surprise. Most of our downstairs is Sherwin Williams Wet Pavement, which gives us a nice cool neutral palette that we L-O-V-E. I ordered this particular chandelier from Houzz, it is the Venice Distressed Wood Chandelier, and it looks just a gorgeous in person! Bonus it was less than $200!!

 

Installation

I feel like I am a pro at installing light fixtures after my last house in Texas, but this was my first try at this place. Lucky for me this was relatively easy, and mouse poo didn’t rain down on me for a change!  After about 20 minutes trying to figure out which unmarked switch would turn the power off to the dinning room I was ready to get rolling.

We don’t have super tall ceilings and this particular lighting fixture came with a really long chain, so I did have to wind it up a bit in the ceiling. Also because I wanted to scoot the massive 120-year-old oak table a little out of the walk way I installed a anchored hook directing into the sheet rock about 8 inches from the actual wiring.

If you do choose to do your own light installation, PLEASE be careful. Messing with the wiring can be simple but it is also super dangerous!

Don’t forget, Cordelia, observing the progress from the top of her newest toy, the chandelier box!!

The Final Product

I absolutely love the way it turned out!! Of course it also called for a shuffle of some furniture and decor pieces. I can’t help but obsess over the drama and contrast that it creates against the gray paint!

Untouched Rustic Farmhouse, Yes Please!

We all dream of finding that diamond in the rough. That fantastic rustic farmhouse just waiting for us to rescue it, or for it to rescue you. I recently stumbled on this one online and I must admit I am drooling. I am totally unabashedly, head over heels in love with this truly untouched 1890s farmhouse. When I first saw articles about this house I really got giddy and knew I just had to share! Oh what would I do if I had access to this massive ornate farmhouse.

Lets take a look at the details!

Keller Williams / Anne Taylor Photography and Design

This 4,000+ square foot farmhouse is true to the Victorian Era, packed full of incredible ornate details. Most notably the railings of the farmhouse porch exhibit amazing design.

Wholly Shiplap Batman!

Keller Williams / Anne Taylor Photography and Design

Are we seeing an entire room of the authentic whitewashed paneling we have all come to know and love, thanks to the Lovely Joanna Gaines? Yes! Absolutely amazing, such drama to this room. Although there is obviously a ton of work to be done, this room still has so much appeal.

Look at these windows!

Keller Williams / Anne Taylor Photography and Design

I am a sucker for big rooms with lots of light. Take a peek at these massive windows in this room! These windows are also pretty characteristic of the era. Big panes of windows became popular during the Victorian period, and they really shine here.

What about that staircase?

Keller Williams / Anne Taylor Photography and Design

Now this isn’t the grandest staircase I have ever seen but It is certainly eye catching. A nice solid, appealing staircase is another must have on my renovation dream check list! I can’t have been the only little girl who dreamed about sauntering down a grand staircase as a princess or perhaps a Jedi…don’t judge me.

 

 

What would you do with this lovely home? Comment below!

 

The Work Begins at the good Ol’ Chicken Farm

ISap9xmifgvym81000000000.jpg

It took my mother a total of 64 years of life before she could purchase her very first home, and it is everything she has ever wanted it to be. A rural farmhouse atop a hill that makes your ears pop as you ascend. Her neighbors are dairy farms, apple orchards and pumpkin patches which leaves her with endless excitement. Just 3 weeks after completing Chemotherapy and her second round of cancer treatment in the last 15 years, she is totally ready to take on the challenges of renovating a 1700s farmhouse.

20171018_130631.jpg

Yesterday we decided it was time to pull down the drop ceiling in what used to be the kitchen, and yes we wondered what could possibly possess a person to put a drop ceiling in an antique home. Well we found out. Midway through my pulling down of the tiles with a crowbar, which I only maimed myself with a little, I found lovely old water damage on the underlying sheetrock. Previous owners had a leak at some point, and while they repaired the cause of the leak they never repaired the underlying damage! They simply put in drop ceiling to conceal it! Talk about a bandaid for a bullet wound!

20171018_142555.jpg

This type of lazy repair work is pretty common in older homes, they have had many years of owners ill-equiped to take on the projects that come in general homeownership let alone the responsibilities of owning an antique home. Any renovation lover can tell of the pain it is to walk around antique homes and see the damage inflicted by previous owners, and how it can take a lot of work to backtrack what has been done.

 

We still have our work cut out for us, 3 more rooms with drop ceilings, moving of plumbing and electrical,  plus replacement of exterior clapboards and windows that have been rotted by water from missing gutters. Keep tuned in as we dig into this antique and get it ready for Grandma D to call it home.

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑